Facce da Biennale

07.06.24 -
15.09.24

The Venice Biennale public between 1948 and 1986 

Curated by Chiara Dall'Olio

The Venice Biennale public between 1948 and 1986 

Address

FMAV - Palazzina dei Giardini:
Corso Cavour, 2, 41121 Modena

Opening times

Opening times (June and September):
Wednesday – Friday: 11 am–1 pm
/ 4–7 pm
  
Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays: 11 am–7 pm 

Opening times (July and August):
Wednesday – Sunday: 3–7 pm

Entry

Free admission  

A selection of 106 black-and-white photographs will be on display from the more than 10,000 shots in the Art Foundation Archive of 6x6 cm film negatives, made by the Cameraphoto photo agency in Venice and owned by Fondazione di Modena. The images in the exhibition tell the story of Italy’s most important, world-famous contemporary art event, the Venice Art Biennale, from the point of view of its visitors. Since it was first held in 1895, the Venetian event has been the object of increasing attention from the public.It is a public not only of figures from the art world – artists, curators, critics, collectors, and journalists – for whoit is the go-to get-together event, but also personalities from the worlds of politics and entertainment, and more and more simple sightseers and art lovers. 

The photographs depict the openings of the biggest exhibitions held in the national pavilions in the time span between 1948 and 1986. The exhibition opens with a portrait of Palma Bucarelli, director of the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna in Rome from 1942 to 1975, pictured in front of a Picasso at the 1948 Biennale. Then the shots go on to immortalize visitors over the years, visiting the exhibitions of GiorgioMorandi, Filippo de Pisis, AlexanderCalder and Giorgio De ChiricoA perplexed AlbertoSordi peeks through Alberto Viani's sculpture Nudo (Nude) at the 1956 Biennale, unwittingly anticipating the famous scenes in the 1978 film Dove vai in vacanza? (Where Are You Going on Holiday?)in which he plays an uninitiated visitor to the Venetian pavilions. The exhibition chronicles the presence in Venice of artists such as Jackson Pollock, Emilio Vedova, AlbertoBurri, Franz Kline, AlbertoGiacometti and Giuseppe Capogrossi, to name but a few. One shot from 1964 depicts American artist Robert Rauschenberg as he sets up his works in the former US Consulate headquarters in San Gregorio, where he exhibited alongside Jim Dine, JasperJohns, MorrisLouis, Kenneth Noland, Frank Stella, John Chamberlain and Claes OldenburgArtists Cesare Tacchi and Renato Mambor or actor PaolaPitagora had their photographs taken alongside the works of Roy LichtensteinBut there are also the faces of politicsAldo Moro visiting the Alberto Burri exhibition, or Pietro Ingrao and Tina Anselmi visiting the "Ambiente-Arte" exhibition in the Central Pavilion. 

And then we get to the series of images of the 1968 protest biennale, amid demonstrations and refusals to participate, or the opposite, artists like Pino Pascali exhibiting in the conviction that his revolutionary works were a protest in themselvesOr the photos from the 1972 Biennale curated by Francesco Arcangeli and Renato Barilli entitled Opera oComportamento (Work or Behaviour), which also made history thanks to the provocative Soluzione d’immortalitàaction by Gino De DominicisUp to the 1978 Biennale, Dalla natura all’arted all’arte alla natura (From Nature to Art from Art to Nature), with the Israeli pavilions flock of live sheep part painted blue by artist Menashe Kadishman, starring alongside the monumental intervention by Staccioli in the "intelligent holidays" episode of the Dove andiamo in vacanza?film. Closing the exhibition are some shots from the 1980s, with works by Vito Acconci (1980); Alberto Burri, on occasion of his solo exhibition at the former Giudecca shipyards in 1982Giuseppe Penone and Claudio Parmiggianiin the 1986 “Arte e scienza” (Art and Science) Biennale. 

 

Info and bookings

Address

FMAV - Palazzina dei Giardini:
Corso Cavour, 2, 41121 Modena

Opening times

Opening times (June and September):
Wednesday – Friday: 11 am–1 pm
/ 4–7 pm
  
Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays: 11 am–7 pm 

Opening times (July and August):
Wednesday – Sunday: 3–7 pm


Entry

Free admission  


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